The Roaring Swing Groovy Fabulous Blog Collaboration | The Recap

HOW ARE WE HERE?

Welcome to the final installment of the #RSFGBlogCollab for 2018! We went back and forth on how to set this post up. We settled on a “Best of the Best”category, a “Through the Ages” category, and a recap of “On Deck” recommendations from the year that I did end up getting to!

Be sure to link-up with Alexandra and I to share the period books and movies and tv shows that you’ve read and watched!

Best of the Best

If I could sum up all my recommendations and give you a TL;DR of the very best…

You need to read Serena by Ron Rash and Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline (1920s) and Ashley Weaver’s Amory Ames series. Also, dip your toes in the Agatha Christie pool with And Then There Were None (1930s). Obviously read The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid (1950s) and alllll the Harry Potter books (1990s). Both of my 2000s books are must-reads: The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein and The Royal We by Heather Cocks and Jessica Morgan.

You need to watch The Mummy (1920s), A League of Their Own (1940s), Roman Holiday, & Clue (1950s). In our family, Secondhand Lions and That Thing You Do are considered classics (1960s). If you haven’t seen the Harry Potter films (1990s), what are you waiting for?! Also, Talladega Nights (2000s) forever and ever.

You need to binge Downton Abbey (1910s/1920s), Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries (1920s), The Astronaut Wives’ Club (1960s), The West Wing (1990s/2000s), & The Newsroom (2000s).

*the Miss Fisher’s series is currently making a movie !! And a new series !!

If you are a history lover, you should check out the following podcasts, too!

Through the Ages

I read a lot of historical fiction (and some nonfiction). Here are some of my favorite books, movies, and television shows that pre-date the 1900-2000 we covered this year!

Books
(1521) The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory
It’s been a long time since I’ve read this book, but when I was in HS it was one of my favorites. It was my (fictional) introduction to the Tudor family and it’s where I fell in love with them. I HATED the film they made from this book, but I actually like the movie version of (book) cover art. I love the green in Natalie Portman’s dress. The movie suuuuuuucked, though.

(1609) The Gentleman’s Poet by Kathryn Johnson
Again, I read this book quite a few years ago, but I loved it. I was in colonial Jamestown over Thanksgiving and they mention this wreck in several stories/museums. I loved that I had a little backstory from having read this- even if a large chuck was dramatized fiction. This is a sweet little love story filled with adventure, survival, and Shakespeare.

(1850s) The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt
One of my all time favorite books ever. (Thanks, Jana!) It’s much darker than I typically read and there isn’t a sparkly happy ending, but DAMN this book is good. The characters are likable and hateable. The story is violent and touching. The setting is awesome. It’s a western, but almost like a Quentin Tarantino western. It’s also a movie now, too. (I won’t be seeing it because I can read violence- I can’t watch it.)

*It’s funny and amazing to think that people were living like the characters in The Sisters Brothers at the EXACT same time as those in my next book, Gaslight. I feel like historical fiction opens your eyes to the unique paradox of our history. Yes, it’s fiction, but these setting happened. 

(1861) A Holiday by Gaslight by Mimi Matthews
I’d be shocked if this wasn’t on Alexandra’s list– she recommended the book on her blog. This is a cute, festive, romantic novella. It’s perfect for a) Christmastime and b) historical fiction lovers. Nothing too steamy in this short romance- just playful banter and gorgeous holiday scenes and the potential for a happily ever after.

(1949-1970s) 84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff
This book technically fell into our collaboration timeline, but I didn’t read it until the decade had passed. (Thanks for the rec, Michelle!) As I’ve recently mentioned, this true collection of letters is a sweet and short picture of Miss Hanff’s interactions with an English bookstore staff. It’s lovely and heartwarming.

Television
(16th century England) The Tudors
This is probably my favorite tv series. The costumes and the stories and the history… plus it’s not too violent as far as Showtime period dramas go. Let’s be real… the women shouldn’t be quite so exposed and Henry VIII should be WAY fatter- especially by the end, but I’m good with it. Also, Natalie Dormer and Henry Cavill are in this series and they are HOT.

“On Deck” Reviews

Books
(1940s) The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer & Annie Barrows
So good. I’m so glad I read it. It was sadly sweet & hopeful. A good WWII novel without too much death and despair.

Movies
(1940s) The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society
A little different from the novel, but equally sweet and charming. I recommended this movie to my grandparents (they loved Downton Abbey) and they LOVED it (without having read the book)!

(1990s) Empire Records
Lots of bloggers rave about this film. (Stephanie’s blog is named after a line from it.) I’d been meaning to watch it but this collaboration finally pushed me to do it. Plus, I found it on Netflix. It was very teen-movie-nineties and I loved it. I loved the relationships and quirkiness of all the characters. It was kind of silly but I really like the take away.

Television
(1930s) And Then There Were None
I ended up finding this 3-episode mini series on hoopla. Holy sh*t, I loved it. It was a perfect dark British mystery. And while Philip Lombard (Aidan Turner) was a very, very terrible man, he was freaking smokin’. Hot damn.

Thank you SO much for going on this historical ride with us!! If you want to relive any of the past decades you can check them out here: 19101920193019401950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000

Check out Alexandra’s wrap up! Don’t forget to link up below!

 CLICK HERE to join in the fun & visit other blogs!

RSFG Reminder

Coming in hot on a Monday. I know this is off schedule for me, but I wanted to remind you about our LINK-UP tomorrow for the Roaring Swinging Fabulous Groovy Blog Collaboration!

Come link-up with us tomorrow and share your favorite historical/fiction books or movies or tv shows. Or review some that you hate. Or share a gift guide for the history lover in your family. The options are endless- just tie it back to history 🙂

See you tomorrow for the link-up, friends!!

What I Read…

Halfway through November… This month has been SO busy for us. The first half of the month was filled with parties (our Halloween one and a surprise party for my mother-in-law!) and the second half will be lots of travel. Whew!

Also- happy birthday to my bro-in-law, Josh!

On October 31st at 11:59pm Erin’s 9.0 Book Challenge came to an end
AND I FINALLY COMPLETED IT!!!

To say I’m thrilled and proud of myself and ecstatic would be an understatement. I started doing book challenges when I began blogging. In my very first challenge I read ONE book. I’m so glad I finished this one!

Ok, on to the books… Linking up with Steph & Jana obvi for Show Us Your Books!

Roomies by Christina Lauren
★★★★/5 
When a marriage of convenience brings Holland closer to her crush of 6 months AND helps both him and her Uncle Robert out, she’s determined to make it happen. But a lot can go wrong when love & citizenship are on the line. 
This romance was one of convenience. (I think I might enjoy the hate to love/gruff male character stories the best- this was not that.) I loved Holland’s name and I loved that she often thought of others. Her best friend was an ass and I was sad to see that play out like it did, but her uncles were wonderful. Her brother was, too. I love when the main (female) lead has a good tribe. The romance itself was ok. Fast and slow, then fast and slow again. I didn’t mind that- it was different. I kind of enjoyed the theater/musical aspect, too. I’m not a huge fan of the self-conscious protagonist. I get it, but still not a fan.
Also, Calvin was Irish and I constantly found myself repeating his words aloud to try to say them with an accent. I also laughed out loud MANY times. It was a funny book.
Should you read it? If you enjoy contemporary romance, yes.

The Sleeper and the Spindle by Neil Gaiman
★★★★★/5 
A twisted fairytale about a brave queen, an evil sorceress, and the curses & choices we’re dealt.
I really loved this little fairytale- it was definitely a little dark and twisty, though quite surface level and quick to get through. The illustrations were 100% necessary and I think fantasy-loving teens would cruise through this book & fully enjoy it. There aren’t any names assigned to anyone, but the Snow White-based queen was blunt and badass, and I really liked her “just do it” attitude. The twist on the Sleeping Beauty story caught me off guard and I ate that up, too. It was a pretty cut and dry fairytale with no backstory (although you could piece in traditional information from the original fairytales), and I’d have loved to know more about the queen’s thoughts, but it was very enjoyable for what it was.
Should you read it? If you like fairytales, yes!
*Thanks to Alexandra for this recommendation!

84, Charing Cross Road by Helen Hanff
★★★★★/5 
A (true) collection of letter between writer & book lover Helen and the staff at a small English bookstore located along Charing Road, spanning from 1949 to 1969. 
(If you loved The Guernsey Lit & PPP Society request this book from your library now.) This collection of letters between Helen Hanff, Frank Doel, and all the characters at the bookshop (and beyond) creates the most witty, humorous, heartwarming story of long distance friendship and generosity. The fact that these were real people writing letters 50+ years ago during war and recontruction and elections and Beatlemania is so strange to think about! And Helen’s real life wit and sarcasm was THE best. I loved how quickly and smartly she formed a friendship with Frank. And her generosity through the years of (UK) rations, as well as her love for the books she received, was so contagious and endearing. I started this short nonfiction one night and finished it the next day. It was wonderful.
Should you read it? Yes, it was quick and witty and heartwarming.
*Thanks to Michelle for this recommendation!

After Alice by Gregory Maguire
★/5 
A tale of post-Alice, both in England and in Wonderland. Alice’s sister Lydia, her friend Ada, & Ada’s governess are all directly affected by Alice’s sudden and alarming disappearance.
Hot damn, I hated this book. I should’ve quit it but it’s an AiW retelling and I felt like I needed to swallow it whole since I’m a diehard fan of the OG. I think Maguire and I just aren’t meant to be friends. (I’ve tried and failed to read Wicked three times.) The majority of GoodReads agrees with me on this particular novel. The story was boring and uninspired, the writing was pretentious and wordy, the characters were completely unlikable (except Siam). How can Lewis Carroll write a book in 1865 that is so whimsical and easy to understand and get lost in… and then Maguire write something in 2015 that is wordy and uppity and too “proper” for its own good?! He totally ruined the retelling. It could’ve been cool, but it wasn’t.
Should you read it? NOPE.

Hansel & Gretel by Neil Gaiman
★★★★/5 
Gaiman’s retelling of the old tale, complete with spooky sketches.
I didn’t realize this was going to be kid-book-short. It’s a very quick read. It’s spooky and dark, though, so I don’t know that kids under 8 or 10 should be exposed. (I’m not a parent- I honestly have no clue.) I loved the illustrations and I like the small changes Gaiman made. I really, really enjoyed the background information on the tried and true tale of Hansel and Gretel. I read this the day before Halloween and it was perfect timing!
Should you read it? Sure. It’s very short and a nice little read for fairy tale lovers.

How to Be a Perfect Christian by The Babylon Bee
DNF/5 
Similar to The Onion, this satirical how-to guide helps one to see the fault in their ways and fully come to understand how to be the perfect church-goer and Child of God.
Mmm… this book really wasn’t my cup of tea. I know lots of Christians love it but this was a good for you, not for me kind of read.
Should you read it? I don’t know. Check out the reviews on GR and decide.

ERIN’S 9.0 CHALLENGE RESULTS

|5 points| Freebie: Roomies by Christina Lauren*
|10 points| Starts with the letter N: Nine Women, One Dress by Jane L. Rosen
|10 points| Has a mostly orange color: A Tyranny of Petticoats by various authors
|15 points| A book with an unlikable character: An Act of Villainy by Ashley Weaver
|20 points| From 100 books PBS calls “The Great American Read”HP & the Prisoner of Azkaban(illustrated version) by J.K. Rowling
|20 points| Related to water in the title: On A Cold Dark Sea by Elizabeth Blackwell
|25 points| Owned/TBR the longest (GoodReads): The Astronaut Wives Club by Lily Koppel
|30 points| An emotion word in the title: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
|30 points| Each word in the title begins with the same letter: After Alice by Gregory Maguire
|35 points| A book featuring a character who shares your profession or similar one (i.e. does the same kind of thing as you do day to day): The Wall of Winnipeg and Me by Mariana Zapata

I’m so happy! 200 out of 200 points!!
*Formerly One Dark Throne by Kendare Blake

So tell me what you read this month! Have you ever participated in a book challenge? Are you a fan of Gregory Maguire’s writing?

Life According to Steph

The Roaring Swinging Fabulous Groovy Blog Collaboration | The 2000s

Ok. How the heck are we at “2000s”? I swear we just kicked this thing off with 1900s/1910s. So crazy how fast this year went in Blogland. Don’t forget– next month we’re hosting a LINK-UP for any and all period dramas, historical/fiction books, and historical movies that you want to review or share!! That will be Tuesday, December 4th!

(Check out Alexandra’s post today, too!)

And now on to the sweet 2000s.

On the first Tuesday of the month, February through November, we’re highlighting books & films from/about specific eras that we recommend! (Television shows, too, sometimes!) There’s no commitment or link-up during those months on your end, but in December we’ll host a recap/link-up for the entire year!

I thought it was hard to find books set in the 2000s.

B O O K S

One of my all time favorite books is The Art of Racing in the Rain (Garth Stein). The reader is introduced to Enzo and his family- and Enzo is a dog. It is one of the most beautiful, heart-wrenching, real books I’ve ever read. And of course I loved it because Enzo is named after the same person/car that my Enzo is named after 🙂

I have no idea why, but The Royal We (Heather Cocks & Jessica Morgan) is one of those stories that has stuck with me. I already loved the royals (whom this book is not-so-loosely based on), but something about the personalities and hardships of each character in this book really stuck with me. It’s kind of long, but I enjoyed all the drama and romance and parallels.

M O V I E S

(2001) It’s been a long time since I’ve seen Save the Last Dance but I loved this movie when I was a teenager. Julia Stiles is such an underrated actress and the whole love story between her and Sean Patrick Thomas’ character is beautiful.

(2001) Does anyone NOT love The Princess Diaries (and also, has anyone not seen The Princess Diaries?!)? I love this adorable movie and the star power this one packs is insane. Julie Andrews, Anne Hathaway, Heather Matarazzo, Mandy Moore, Sandra Oh… And Brink.

(2001, 2004, 2007) My love for the Ocean’s movies knows no bounds (including Ocean’s 8!!). I’ll admit that, as far as the male cast movies go, 11 is my favorite with 13 being a close second. I’m crossing my fingers that we get a 9 and 10 (with the ladies!) because this franchise is the best.

(2004) My favorite Pixar movie is The Incredibles. I love the story and the musical score and each character. Violet and Dash’s relationship is my favorite. I haven’t seen The Incredibles 2 yet but I need to!

(2006) It’s no surprise that Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby shows up on my list. We probably watch it every time it’s on TV and we definitely quote it daily. Damn- it’s just so funny and good and quotable. Especially for a NASCAR lover.

*dates indicate both when the movie was released AND when I think it was set

B O N U S

I mentioned The West Wing in our 90s post but most of it takes place in the 2000s. Seriously guys, if you haven’t watch it yet, DO IT.

Has everyone already seen The Office? It’s hysterical and awkward (and mildly not PC). Easy to binge, easy to follow, good mindless television.

On Deck…

Middle school/high school (without Hulu or Netflix) made me miss a lot of good shows. I’d love to watch:

  • Veronica Mars
  • Friday Night Lights
  • 30 Rock

Be sure to hope over to Alexandra’s blog and check out her recommendations!

Next month we are linking up & we want you to join us!

Did you watch or read any of our suggestions from year? Maybe you thought of your own recommendations and you’ve been waiting for the right time to share them! Perhaps you just *happened* to read a book from the 1950s and you want to review it!

There’s no right or wrong way to link-up with us! Just do it! We will see you December 4th for our final Roaring Swinging Fabulous Groovy Blog Collaboration post!! Join us, won’t you?

Check out our past posts from this series: 19101920193019401950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990

What I Read…

This month’s book roundup is a little light so I added a questionnaire at the end!

As always, linking up with Steph & Jana for Show Us Your Books!! Happy 4th Anniversary, ladies!!!

On a Cold Dark Sea by Elizabeth Blackwell
★★★/5
Three women board the Titanic, survive the tragedy, and live to rebuild their lives, but the weight of their choices do not sink with the boat. Twenty years later fate reunites them & old secrets and stories are brought back to the surface. 
I enjoyed this book, but it didn’t blow my mind. I loved that all three women came from different walks of life and the author opened the book with stories of their lives before the ship sailed. I liked how the story was set up. I thought the jumping around was easy to follow and it definitely added something to the women’s stories. But there were things I didn’t like… First of all, I feel like there wasn’t much of a point. There was a weird focus on romance- the ending was especially odd. It was also kind of slow. I don’t mind a slow pace in a historical fiction, but it reminded me of a British drama- very slow and building, small twists but nothing mind blowing, polite with hints at impropriety. It was a good story about the Titanic and how people felt after they’d survived- I really enjoyed the historical aspect of it.
Should you read it? If you enjoy historical fiction, reading about the first half of the 20th century, and British dramas, yes.

An Act of Villainy by Ashley Weaver
★★★★★/5 
When amateur socialite detective Amory Ames and her husband Milo are asked to look into drama at a friend’s theater they are both suddenly swept up into a world of acting and mystery.
I love this series. Weaver’s most recent book, Villainy, was just released in September and it’s the perfect installment in the Amory story. (I actually rate this book a 4.75 but I round up.) I love that she’s *actually* working with her husband, not against him, and I also love that their marriage is slowly but surely improving. This book had a few repeat characters and many new ones. I didn’t love the theater setting but it didn’t detract from the story in any way. I 100% did NOT see the ending coming, although it’s similar to an Agatha Christie in that I don’t know if there’d been enough signs for me to guess the ending (thus the docked .25 star). I hope/can’t wait for the next Amory story!
Should you read it? Yes, but read from the start of the series.

As far as Erin’s 9.0 challenge goes…

|5 points| Freebie: One Dark Throne by Kendare Blake
|10 points| Starts with the letter N: Nine Women, One Dress by Jane L. Rosen
|10 points| Has a mostly orange color: A Tyranny of Petticoats by various authors
|15 points| A book with an unlikable character: An Act of Villainy by Ashley Weaver
|20 points| From 100 books PBS calls “The Great American Read”HP & the Prisoner of Azkaban(illustrated version) by J.K. Rowling
|20 points| Related to water in the title: On A Cold Dark Sea by Elizabeth Blackwell
|25 points| Owned/TBR the longest (GoodReads): The Astronaut Wives Club by Lily Koppel
|30 points| An emotion word in the title: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
|30 points| Each word in the title begins with the same letter: After Alice by Gregory Maguire
|35 points| A book featuring a character who shares your profession or similar one (i.e. does the same kind of thing as you do day to day): The Wall of Winnipeg and Me by Mariana Zapata

I have 165 out of 200 points!


I snagged this tag from Sarah Elizabeth!

Hardback or trade paperback or mass market paperback?
I’ll read any format, but I like hardbacks the best.

Amazon or brick and mortar?
Brick & Mortar for sure. I resort to Amazon when I need a Kindle book or a hard to find book.

Locally owned bookshop or big name chain store?
Any bookstore near me! I only have a locally owned bookshop in town, though.

Bookmark or dog-ear?
Usually a bookmark. I’ll dog-ear my own copies if absolutely necessary.

Alphabetize by author or alphabetize by title or random?
Alphabetize by author.

Keep, throw away, or sell?
What monster throws books away?! Usually keep. Occasionally gift or donate.

Keep dust jacket or toss it?
Keep it.

Read with dust jacket or remove it?
I don’t have an issue with the dust jacket. I leave it on.

Short story or novel?
I like both 🙂 It just depends on my mood.

Collection (short stories by same author) or anthology (short stories by different authors)?
I don’t have much experience here, but I like anthologies.

Stop reading when tired or at chapter breaks?
Usually at chapter breaks. If the authors ends every chapter with a cliffhanger then eventually I stop when I’m tired.

“It was a dark and stormy night” or “Once upon a time”?
It was a dark and stormy night 😉 Not so much thrillers, but adventure or mystery!

Buy or borrow?
Both.

New or used?
Both.

Tidy ending or cliffhanger?
I like tidy endings. If I’m planning to pick up a sequel immediately, I’m ok with cliffhangers.

Morning, afternoon or nighttime reading?
I like to read on weekend mornings and weekday nights.

Single volume or series?
Both.

Favorite series?
Harry Potter, The Lunar Chronicles. When I was younger I like American Girl books and The Magic Tree House and books by Eva Ibbotson.

Favorite books read last year?
The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo (Taylor Jenkins Reid), The Handmaid’s Tale (Margaret Atwood), The Bear and the Nightingale (Katherine Arden), The Art of Racing in the Rain (Garth Stein), And Then There Were None (Agatha Christie), The Sisters Brothers (Patrick deWitt).

Favorite books of all time?
Alice in Wonderland & the Harry Potter series.


What did you read this month?

Life According to Steph

The Roaring Swinging Fabulous Groovy Blog Collaboration | The 1990s

Hello & welcome to the decade of my birth. I know I’m bias, but I sure do love the 90s. From magazine ads and photos clipped and tacked on my wall to my Walkman skipping on the bus ride home to my Lisa Frank notebook filled with cursive and multiplication problems. So hella cool.

Also, while we don’t usually hit on music, two of my all time favorite bands originated in the 1990s. Dave Matthews Band started in 1991 and the Foo Fighters formed in 1994. If you don’t listen to them, you should 😉

Alright, let’s get back on track…

B O O K S

The Harry Potter series is set in the 90s. Maybe that’s why it’s so amazing and wildly successful 😉 Just kidding. Kind of. But obviously this series ends up on my recommendation list. The Battle of Hogwarts was in May 1998 so the six books preceding Deathly Hallows all occur in the six years prior.

M O V I E S

Once again, Harry Potter is at the top of my list.
(1991-1998) I am very passionate about the book > movie debate. And I don’t think that HP is an exception necessarily, but I will say that the movies possess a magic all their own, and the music and acting that accompany them are beautiful and amazing. So if you’re a staunch HP book lover and adamantly against the movies, give them a shot.

(1991) If you’ve ever questioned my love for Robin William’s acting then question it no more. Hook is one of two RW films on my list 🙂 If you didn’t just holler “RUUUUFIIIIOOOOO” in your head then you need to watch it again. I love how the old story of Peter Pan is brought to life.

(1995) I have one R movie on my list… I haven’t seen it in a long time and I probably won’t ever watch it start to finish again, but the movie Se7en is a series mind-twist. It’s violent and vulgar and 100% not my kind of thing, but I remember loving the story line when I first saw it. If crimes films (and 1990s Brad Pitt 😍) ARE your thing, you should watch this.

(1995) Has everyone seen the original Jumanji movie? Not the one with Kevin Hart and The Rock. I’m talking about the classic with Robert Williams and Bonnie Hunt and Kirsten Dunst. SO GOOD. I could do without the spider and mosquito scenes, but I just cover my eyes 🙂 For being a fun kids movie it makes me whole body shake with anxiety every time they roll the dice.

(1999) Soon after we first started dating my husband (boyfriend at the time, obviously) asked if I wanted to watch Notting Hill. I’d never seen it but shrugged and said sure. It’s such a cute movie and it’s super cute when your teenage boyfriend suggests it. I think he’s just always had a crush on Julia Roberts. Lol

(1999) I absolutely love the movie 10 Things I Hate About You. I think Julia Stiles is amazing and obviously Heath Ledger is crazy adorable. And Joseph Gordon-Levitt is cute, too! It’s a loose retelling of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew & the late 90s fashion is on point.

*dates indicate setting, not release

B O N U S

The West Wing kicked off in 1999. Honestly, I think everyone should watch this series. Besides the actors being incredible, the stories are so humbling and intriguing and timely.

On Deck…

  • Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
  • Joy (film)
  • The First Wives Club (film)
  • The To Do List (film)
  • Empire Records (film)

Go check out what Alexandra recommended from the 1990s!

Next month is our last month of recommendations! (HOW are we at the end already?!) We are diving head first into the first decade of the 2000s. The threat of global warming loomed larger, the War on Terror was born, and the world became obsessed with superhero films. Join us for a blast from the most recent decade.

Check out our past posts from this series: 19101920193019401950, 1960, 1970, 1980

Thoughts While Rereading Harry Potter & the Prisoner of Azkaban

Grab your cauldron and teas leaves, and join me for another installment of thoughts about Harry Potter. I’ve already covered the Sorcerer’s Stone and the Chamber of Secrets. Today we’re talking about my favorite book!

I feel like The Prisoner of Azkaban is the book that ties Harry’s past with his future. His friendships are cemented with Ron and Hermione, and the Weasley’s prove to him that they’re on his side (Arthur fills him in, Molly loves him, Fred and George help him out AGAIN). He learns more about his past and starts to visualize a future. He’s finally comfortable being a wizard. I LOVE the relationships in this book.

Alright. Let’s do this. *No true spoilers, but there’s alluding. Just FYI.

Every single time Crookshanks goes after Scabbers I silently cheer.

I know I said last time that McGonagall is my all time fav, but Lupin is, too. I love that man.

When Ron stands up for Hermione in Snape’s Defense Against the Dark Art’s class I actually lost it and laughed while also gasping.

In comparison, I like the way Harry finds out about Black’s actions better in the film. I like the way the full moon events unfold better in the book.

I appreciate how Snape and Lupin treat one another throughout the year. I like that we’re getting some history without ACTUALLY getting their history (or knowing that there’s beef there). Well, until they actually tell the trio about it.

Let’s address the weird elephant in the room… When I was a pre/teen reading these books I obviously had little crushes on Harry and the Weasleys and all their friends. As an adult? Remus Lupin is looking goooood. And a cleaned up Sirius ain’t half bad himself. Weird, man. Weird. (George Weasley will always have my heart, though.)

Hearing the adults talk about Black makes me so frustrated. But seeing Harry be so comfortable with Lupin warms my heart. This book gives me ALL THE FEELS.

“Moony, Wormtail, Padfoot, and Prongs,” sighed George, patting the heading of the map. “We owe them so much.”

No mention of the fidelius charm in the movie…

The depth and complexity in which Lupin’s tale intertwines with Harry’s is masterful. Lupin has such a rough go at life & every single time he feels joy is so bittersweet. He’s so resilient and strong. And he’s so calm and collected. I just love him.

I’d forgotten how invest HR&H are involved in Hagrid and his court case. 

Hermione’s interaction with Malfoy: 🙌 🙌 🙌 

McGonagall yelling at Lee during the Quidditch games is my favorite part of every game. 

Poor Neville…

The respect that Lupin has for Hermione is THE BEST. He’s is sooooo aware of the fact that H & R would be dead without her. 

The movie makes Dumbledore look suspiciously oblivious to Harry & Hermione’s final task. In the book he’s in cahoots with them and I think it makes it that much better. 

The movies make Dumbledore so explosive and Snape so calm. That is the COMPLETE opposite in the books. Snape constantly loses his temper. 

Listen… if you’ve *tried* to read the HP series and only made it through book 2, I am begging you to pick up #3 and give it a read.

I’m not sure when I’ll get around to book 4. They’ve pushed the release date back to 2019 and I heard that it’s being broken up into two books…

Which Harry Potter book is your favorite? I feel like a lot of people love PoA 🙂